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Some unclear passages in the Coffin Texts suggest that Apep was thought capable of injuring or stealing the Eye of Ra from its master during the combat.

Evidence in early funerary texts suggests that at dawn, Ra was believed to swallow the multitude of other gods, who in this instance are equated with the stars, which vanish at sunrise and reappear at sunset.

The solar Eye is said to assist in this effort, slaughtering the gods for Ra to eat. The red light of dawn therefore signifies the blood produced by this slaughter.

He sends the Eye—Hathor, in her aggressive manifestation as the lioness goddess Sekhmet —to massacre them. She does so, but after the first day of her rampage, Ra decides to prevent her from killing all humanity.

He orders that beer be dyed red and poured out over the land. The Eye goddess drinks the beer, mistaking it for blood, and in her inebriated state returns to Ra without noticing her intended victims.

Through her drunkenness she has been returned to a harmless form. The red beer might then refer to the red silt that accompanied the subsequent Nile flood, which was believed to end the period of misfortune.

In the myth of the "Distant Goddess", a motif with several variants, the Eye goddess becomes upset with Ra and runs away from him.

In some versions the provocation for her anger seems to be her replacement with a new eye after the search for Shu and Tefnut, but in others her rebellion seems to take place after the world is fully formed.

This motif also applies to the Eye of Horus, which in the Osiris myth is torn out and must be returned or healed so that Horus may regain his strength.

Meanwhile, the Eye wanders in a distant land— Nubia , Libya , or Punt. To restore order, one of the gods goes out to retrieve her.

In one version, known from scattered allusions, the warrior god Anhur searches for the Eye, which takes the form of the goddess Mehit , using his skills as a hunter.

In other accounts, it is Shu who searches for Tefnut, who in this case represents the Eye rather than an independent deity.

When the goddess is at last placated, the retrieving god escorts her back to Egypt. Her return marks the beginning of the inundation and the new year.

The pacified Eye deity is once more a procreative consort for the sun god, or, in some versions of the story, for the god who brings her back. The dual nature of the Eye goddess shows, as Graves-Brown puts it, that "the Egyptians saw a double nature to the feminine, which encompassed both extreme passions of fury and love.

The characteristics of the Eye of Ra were an important part of the Egyptian conception of female divinity in general, [35] and the Eye was equated with many goddesses, ranging from very prominent deities like Hathor to obscure ones like Mestjet, a lion goddess who appears in only one known inscription.

The Egyptians associated many gods who took felid form with the sun, and many lioness deities, like Sekhmet, Menhit, and Tefnut, were equated with the Eye.

Bastet was depicted as both a domestic cat and a lioness, and with these two forms she could represent both the peaceful and violent aspects of the Eye.

Mut was first called the Eye of Ra in the late New Kingdom, and the aspects of her character that were related to the Eye grew increasingly prominent over time.

Likewise, cobra goddesses often represented the Eye. Among them was Wadjet , a tutelary deity of Lower Egypt who was closely associated with royal crowns and the protection of the king.

The deities associated with the Eye were not restricted to feline and serpent forms. Frequently, two Eye-related goddesses appear together, representing different aspects of the Eye.

Similarly, Mut, whose main cult center was in Thebes, sometimes served as an Upper Egyptian counterpart of Sekhmet, who was worshipped in Memphis in Lower Egypt.

These goddesses and their iconographies frequently mingled. The Eye of Ra was invoked in many areas of Egyptian religion, [55] and its mythology was incorporated into the worship of many of the goddesses identified with it.

In another temple ritual, the pharaoh played a ceremonial game in honor of the Eye goddesses Hathor, Sekhmet, or Tefnut, in which he struck a ball symbolizing the Eye of Apep with a club made from a type of wood that was said to have sprung from the Eye of Ra.

The concept of the solar Eye as mother, consort, and daughter of a god was incorporated into royal ideology. Pharaohs took on the role of Ra, and their consorts were associated with the Eye and the goddesses equated with it.

The priestesses who acted as ceremonial "wives" of particular gods during the Third Intermediate Period c. The violent form of the Eye was also invoked in religious ritual and symbolism as an agent of protection.

The uraeus on royal and divine headdresses alludes to the role of the Eye goddesses as protectors of gods and kings. Many temple rituals called upon Eye goddesses to defend the temple precinct or the resident deity.

Often, the texts of such rituals specifically mention a set of four defensive uraei. These uraei are sometimes identified with various combinations of goddesses associated with the Eye, but they can also be seen as manifestations of "Hathor of the Four Faces", whose protection of the solar barque is extended in these rituals to specific places on earth.

The Eye of Ra could also be invoked to defend ordinary people. Some apotropaic amulets in the shape of the Eye of Horus bear the figure of a goddess on one side.

These amulets are most likely an allusion to the connection between the Eye of Horus and the Eye of Ra, invoking their power for personal protection.

Models like those in the spells have been found in the remains of ancient Egyptian towns, and they include bowls in front of their mouths where fuel could be burnt, although the known examples do not show signs of burning.

Egyptian funerary texts associate deceased souls with Ra in his nightly travels through the Duat , the realm of the dead, and with his rebirth at dawn.

In these texts the Eye and its various manifestations often appear, protecting and giving birth to the deceased as they do for Ra.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. The Journal of Egyptian Archaeology. Darnell, John Coleman Journal of Ancient Near Eastern Religions.

Crowns in Egyptian Funerary Literature: Royalty, Rebirth, and Destruction. Women in Ancient Egypt. In Dieleman, Jacco; Wendrich, Willeke.

In Shafer, Byron E. Religion in Ancient Egypt: Who wants to give the story of a Holocaust survivor just two stars? Scenes change in the matter of a sentence, the dialogue often seems only broken with stage directions.

It was all very one-note. The characters, even Lale himself, are flat and poorly developed. The whole book felt very amateurish, and I cannot recommend it.

I received an advance copy of this book courtesy of the publisher and NetGalley. Rainforest Escape I agree with you. And I think books such as this should Jan 30, Considering "The Tattooist of Auschwitz" is a harrowing true story, it was truly compelling and utterly unputdownable.

On arrival at Auschwitz in he immediately stands out to his fellow prisoners who save his life when he tak Considering "The Tattooist of Auschwitz" is a harrowing true story, it was truly compelling and utterly unputdownable.

On arrival at Auschwitz in he immediately stands out to his fellow prisoners who save his life when he takes ill. One of them is a girl called Gita who captures his heart immediately.

Given a reason to survive Lale uses his position for the greater good even through struggles and extreme suffering, with the hope of one day being with Gita forever, outside of the camp.

I immediately took to all the real life characters, they were excellently portrayed whether good or bad and could imagine the whole true scenario with such clarity.

Compassionately written with sensitivity, its emotive, thought provoking, awe inspiring and certainly puts your own everyday problems into perspective.

View all 68 comments. Right after I started reading this book there was a story on the local news about a new exhibit at the Jewish Community Center in our area.

The exhibit highlights the Holocaust survivors from this area. At kiosks you can click on a name, read a bio but what struck me the most was that you can also see a video of the survivor telling their story.

The utmost importance of these stories is reflected at the beginning of this book by author Graeme Simsion: Heather Morris has retold the story of Lale Sokolov, a Jewish prisoner at Auschwitz who becomes the camp tattooist and while there finds the love of his life, Gita.

This stared out as a screenplay she wrote as Lale told her his story and has been developed into this "novel". Lale from the first day he arrives in Auschwitz by cattle car, makes a vow to himself that he would survive this and after falling in love with Gita, he makes a promise to her that they will have a life together when they are out.

That he can speak multiple languages saves Lale multiple times as well as connections made with other people imprisoned, with workers from the outside and even a German guard.

With jewelry and cash gotten from the women who work in the building where belongings are sorted, Lale with his savvy, his courage and with some luck barters for time with Gita for the price of chocolate, a piece of sausage , a hunk of bread, a diamond or ruby.

But he also provides as much food as he can to others. He helps many people along the way putting himself in danger each day as each day he tattoos numbers onto the arms of the new inhabitants.

He does seem to have an existence in some ways better than most in the camp and better than when he first arrived until he is caught with the jewels.

There is not much more I can say other than what Lale himself tells Morris - that he wanted his story recorded so "It would never happen again.

View all 95 comments. This is a historical fiction novel based on a true story. Lale Sokolov tells his story based on true events.

He became the main tattooist of Aushwitz and falls in love at first sight with Gita who he first met tattooing her arm. He tattoos all the new prisoners with their identification numbers.

Lale is a Jew. He is on the first transport of men from Slovakia to Auschwitz in The concentration camp was very horrifying. Lale did have some special privileges, since he was the tatto 4.

Lale did have some special privileges, since he was the tattoist. He had lots of freedom than the other prisoners.

He was so brave and had lots of courage. He would exchange jewels and money from murdered Jews for food to keep others alive. If he was caught he would of been killed.

Many prisoners owed him their survival. He was a leader among the other prisoners. Their are some graphic scenes that are a little dark. This book stands out from other Holocaust related novels.

It is an emotional read. The Nazi guards are monsters, they kill and hurt human beings. Lale was determined to survive.

This is a terrible story but it also is a story of hope and courage. I really did love this story. It was almost like reading a memoir, but a little different than a memoir.

This story is an emotional read, but I also found it uplifting at times. I would say this is a safer read than other Holocaust novels.

I am so happy that the author spent a lot of time with him, to tell his story. She really did an amazing job on his character.

All the characters were very well done and made this novel come alive. I loved the love story between Lale and Gita and how they fall in love at first sight.

I love a romance in a novel only when there is lots of suspense. Its always the suspense that I am looking for and this one has ok plenty of it.

I felt so sad for Cilka, and everything she went through. I also felt sad for Leon. There are some scenes that are graphic but this is the Holocaust, a horrifying time and as I mentioned before this is a safer read than other Holocaust books.

I could not put this book down. It was a page turner. I loved the writing style. This was a Traveling Sister read and I loved reading this with them and it was a wonderful discussion.

This is a great book to do as a group read. I want to thank Netgalley, the publisher and Heather Morris for a copy of this book in exchange for a honest review.

View all 67 comments. I recall, as a child, accompanying one or the other of my parents to our family jeweler countless times.

It seemed as if some piece always needed to be repaired or purchased for one occasion or another. For my tenth birthday I received a small sapphire and diamond ring which was too large and needed to be resized.

One day after school off we went to see Marty and Irv. It was an unseasonably warm fall day and Irv had his shirtsleeves rolled up.

When he placed his arm on the glass countertop, I sa I recall, as a child, accompanying one or the other of my parents to our family jeweler countless times.

When he placed his arm on the glass countertop, I saw the tattooed numbers on his arm for the very first time. I felt, also for the first time, a cold clenching my stomach.

That very day, at the age of ten, I had watched Night and Fog as part of my fifth grade curriculum and my physical reaction was the painful shock of recognition.

It was disturbing to me that this kind and gentle man had been subjected to and survived the death camps. What I will say about this book is that it tells a story of hope amid horror.

I will also say that the writing is sophomoric. However, I do think this is a book that is well suited for young teens as an introduction to this very dark part of history.

View all 40 comments. View all 9 comments. The German government needed workers for their labor camps. In , all families in Slovakia were ordered to provide a child eighteen or older for work detail or risk having the entire family sent to concentration camp.

Lale Sokolov hoped that by going to Prague to await these instructions his family would be safe. He did not expect to be forced into a cattle wagon and be transported to Auschwitz.

He was determined to do as he was told, reveal little about himself and always be observant. In order to survive, he had to defile innocent people.

The job of "Tetovierer" did have some perks. Lale was given his own room and increased food rations which he hid under his sleeve to distribute to others when possible.

One day, Lale saw a girl with the darkest brown eyes. He made a vow to himself. He will leave Auschwitz a free man. He has just met the love of his life!

Through cunning, luck and love, Lale is instrumental in setting up a barter system with paid bricklayers, Victor and Yuri. Diamonds and chocolate entice an occasional guard or capo as well.

This slim tome documents less familiar aspects of Holocaust literature. This is an incredible book with a story that demands to be heard.

The year is and it gladdens me that books like this are still being written. Because we need to know and understand what humanity is capable of, we need to know what extreme hate looks like so we can work towards building a world free from it.

This is one of our darkest hours, and we need to remember it. This i This is an incredible book with a story that demands to be heard. This is a true story.

The characters were real people. They were plucked from the mind of a dying old man who is also the protagonist who wanted his story to be heard by the world.

It took him over seventy years to muster the courage to tell it, Morris is the instrument of his words. We all know about Auschwitz, though there is something intimate about this particular story.

He wonders if for the rest of his life, be it short or long, he will be defined by this moment, this irregular number: He was given a position of trust and was able to move around the camps at will.

As such he smuggled in extra food rations for those that needed it most. He brought them medicine and aid whenever he could, consolation for living apart from those that suffered the most.

The narrative was incredibly tense because death was never far away. There was no system, just merciless killing at the whim of the oppressors.

Doctor Mendel Doctor Death was the best example. He was an evil man, cold and fear inducing. Whenever he entered a scene the trepidation of the characters was palpable.

Morris did wonders to capture the presence of such a callous man. With all darkness, there comes light. In the depths of the death camp there is also life, love and family: Despite how cruelly the Jews were treated, despite how far they were objectified and made to feel less than human, they still managed to cling onto their identities and the very things that make them who they are.

Hope endured for some, hope that they would some day be liberated and have the opportunity to begin a new life. He never looses his optimism.

He never stops trying to help people. Blog Twitter Facebook Insta Academia View all 6 comments. At first Lale is working on a roof, and this is what he does for a while until his kapo says he needs a boy to do his bidding, run errands, bring him food and the like.

He meets Gita, whom he only knows by the number he tattooed to her arm, no words exchanged of course. A slip of paper with the number that was to be permanently marked on her skin were the only words that accompanied her.

Eventually, he manages to introduce himself through channels and messages passed. Eventually an infatuation turns to love. Impotent rage, horror, fear, sympathy and an overwhelming sense of powerlessness engulf him, not only for him, but for all those prisoners subjected to the torture, abuse, humiliation.

They merely remind him of the chasm between what life can be and what it is now. A group of us went there together, even the memory it still makes it hard for me to breathe.

Photographs of the conditions, of how it appeared for those who were held captive — not so much living, but barely existing there.

That these people are more than just numbers to be totaled, they are people who loved, who were loved and had hopes and dreams.

My deepest respect goes to the author for having the compassion and emotional stamina to hear these stories directly from Lale Sokolov, and bring these stories to us in such a truly lovely ode to love and the will to survive.

View all 61 comments. Incapable of being apprehended by the mind of the senses. Stories that need to be told This one sat for many years - decades - untold Shame - love - guilt - survival - Love Sad - Beautiful- powerful - emotional - honest reviews.

View all 31 comments. Suportaram fome, torturas, espancamentos, Os sobreviventes do holocausto foram mestres na luta com armas sem balas!

Num local de torturas, espancamentos e gente sub-subnutrida, o amor acontece! Simplesmente sabe-se, e pronto! Lale e Gita sobreviveram!

View all 29 comments. Books like this need to be published and read, as I think that despite everyone knowing what the Holocaust was, I think people might be in danger of forgetting just how truly horrifying it was, and the lowest depths of humanity.

Not everyday was filled with violence, some days nothing happened at all - and the prisoners whiled away the days, too starved or beaten to really do anything.

It is written more as a timeline, than a novel. He just turned up at the train station and she just got off?!

Is that actually how easily it happened? I would have liked to have seen a bit more of his research into how he knew she would be there?

Or was it literally just fate? Politics and religion both. View all 14 comments. Reviewing a novel about the Holocaust on Holocaust Remembrance day seems both apropos, and a great responsibility.

As long as there are people who need to tell! Their stories, I will continue to read and remember. This is a fictionalized account of a true story, told to the author in the final days of his life.

Lale was a young Jewish man from Slovakia, with much to look forward to, when in an effort to save the rest of his family, he is taken to Auschwitz.

There he will become the Reviewing a novel about the Holocaust on Holocaust Remembrance day seems both apropos, and a great responsibility. There he will become the tattooist, the man who tattoos those horrendous numbers on the prisoners arms.

How he uses this freedom is a big part of the story. A story with many horrors terrors and yes even love. I dislike rating these stories.

They were, but this young man was fortunate, not a good word to use obviously, in many instances that found others either shot or beaten to death.

He had a sunny personality and vowed to survive the camp, maybe the reason the tone of this was more light than many others of the camps that I have read.

Maybe this is the story he needed to remember to survive, only he can know that. The writing is less emotional than some, a kind of storytelling tone, which I guess makes sense as the author was telling a story.

For me though, often times, I felt an emotional disconnect. It is though, impossible not to like Lale, he indeed uses his position, well.

We meet other important characters, the young woman who he would come to love, her friends. Some of the guards, and all play their parts in this story.

I do love how at the end of the book the author lets the reader know what happened to some of the main people in this novel.

At the end there is an added bonus and it is here that I felt all the emotions I had been missing. A sisters read that provided a very interesting discussion.

View all 32 comments. The story of two extraordinary people, Lale and Gita survive the horrors of Auschwitz and find solace in each other.

The book is based on their true story. Lale has the job of tattooist and must tattoo numbers on the arms of countless men, women and children.

One day he tattooed on the arm and Gita. He recalled this day as the day "he tattooed her number on her left arm, she tattooed her number on his heart.

The story follows their years together at Auschwitz and beyond the war. The writing was straight forward without a lot of depth into the characters emotions, yet as a reader, it stirred up all my feelings of intense sadness, fear and shock of what they endured.

View all 47 comments. A unsettling but gripping novel, based on the true story of Lale, a Slovakian Jew caught up in the horrors of the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp during WW2.

He speaks several languages, so soon finds himself employed in the camp as the tattooist, the man responsible for inscribing prisoners numbers on their arms.

He soon meets and falls in love with Gita, a fellow inmate. This is a beautifully told tale, Helen Mo A unsettling but gripping novel, based on the true story of Lale, a Slovakian Jew caught up in the horrors of the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp during WW2.

This is a beautifully told tale, Helen Morris captures the essence of the camp well. I visited Auschwitz-Birkenau earlier this year and found it to be chilling and disturbing.

One can only speculate at the deranged minds of those that caused such suffering. I read through this book it quickly in one sitting, and though it outlines the horrors of war, it shows the strength of the human spirit, and that there is always something to hope for.

Highly recommended, this is one that will stay with you for a long time. View all 17 comments. An interesting tale based on a true story but not really comprehensively told.

I enjoyed what was there but there seemed to be so much left out! Lale was obviously a charming rogue who managed to survive all those years in Auschwitz despite bringing himself to the attention of the authorities repeatedly and in very serious ways.

It was amazing that a life long love affair could have begun in such a place and even more amazing that they both survived and found each other again after the war.

Obvi An interesting tale based on a true story but not really comprehensively told. Obviously it was meant to be.

There must have been a lot more to this story than we are made aware of. I even felt occasionally that the book was aimed at a young adult audience as various atrocities were mentioned only in passing.

As a reader I never felt the pain or the sorrow, just watched it from a distance. To me the author let the subject down.

Fortunately the story is so incredible it stands up for itself. A good read, but not a great one. View all 16 comments. Jan 29, Tracy agree, just finished and there was something missing, after reading your review I realised what it was Lale, being able to speak many languages, was given the job of tattooing the numbers on the incoming prisoners, he met Gita when she was in his line to be tattooed and was immediately taken with her.

Being the tattooist at the camp gave Lale much more freedom of movement then most prisoners and he came upon money and jewels from the murdered Jews to get food to keep other prisoners alive This is a novel based on the true story of Lale and Gita Sokolov, two Slovakian Jewish prisoners at Auschwitz.

Being the tattooist at the camp gave Lale much more freedom of movement then most prisoners and he came upon money and jewels from the murdered Jews to get food to keep other prisoners alive.

Lale was so brave, he took many risks, could have been killed at any time if caught, but his strong determination for the survival of he and Gita was above all else.

Huge thank you to NetGalley for this Read Now advanced copy! View all 21 comments. It all began with Lale and how he was chosen to be the person who tattoos numbers on the prisoners at Auschwitz and Birkenau.

As one can imagine, this was heartbreaking work; but as Pepau a fellow tattooist told Lale, at least it was being done by someone with a heart.

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The Egyptians often referred to the sun and the moon as the "eye"s of particular gods. The right eye of the god Horus , for instance, was equated with the sun, and his left eye equated with the moon.

At times the Egyptians called the lunar eye the " Eye of Horus ", a concept with its own complex mythology and symbolism, and called the solar eye the "Eye of Ra"— Ra being the preeminent sun god in ancient Egyptian religion.

However, in Egyptian belief, many terms and concepts are fluid, so the sun could also be called the "Eye of Horus".

The yellow or red disk-like sun emblem in Egyptian art represents the Eye of Ra. Because of the great importance of the sun in Egyptian religion, this emblem is among the most common religious symbols in all of Egyptian art.

As the sun, the Eye of Ra is a source of heat and light, and it is associated with fire and flames. The eyes of Egyptian deities , although they are aspects of the power of the gods who own them, sometimes take active roles in mythology, possibly because the word for "eye" in Egyptian , jrt , resembles another word meaning "do" or "act".

The presence of the feminine suffix -t in jrt may explain why these independent eyes were thought of as female. Ra emerges from the body of a goddess who represents the sky—usually Nut.

Depictions of the rising sun often show Ra as a child contained within the solar disk. In this context, the Egyptologist Lana Troy suggests, the disk may represent the womb from which he is born or the placenta that emerges with him.

The Eye of Ra can also take the form of a goddess, which according to Troy is both the mother who brings Ra forth from her womb and a sister who is born alongside him like a placenta.

Ra was sometimes said to enter the body of the sky goddess at sunset, impregnating her and setting the stage for his rebirth at sunrise.

Consequently, the Eye, as womb and mother of the child form of Ra, is also the consort of the adult Ra.

The adult Ra, likewise, is the father of the Eye who is born at sunrise. Ra gives rise to his daughter, the Eye, who in turn gives rise to him, her son, in a cycle of constant regeneration.

Ra is not unique in this relationship with the Eye. Other solar gods may interact in a similar way with the numerous goddesses associated with the Eye.

Hathor , a goddess of the sky, the sun, and fertility, is often called the Eye of Ra, and she also has a relationship with Horus, who also has solar connections, that is similar to the relationship between Ra and his Eye.

The myth takes place before the creation of the world , when the solar creator—either Ra or Atum—is alone. Shu and Tefnut , the children of this creator god, have drifted away from him in the waters of Nu , the chaos that exists before creation in Egyptian belief, so he sends out his Eye to find them.

The Eye returns with Shu and Tefnut but is infuriated to see that the creator has developed a new eye, which has taken her place.

The creator god appeases her by giving her an exalted position on his forehead in the form of the uraeus , the emblematic cobra that appears frequently in Egyptian art, particularly on royal crowns.

These tears give rise to the first humans. In a variant of the story, it is the Eye that weeps instead, so the Eye is the progenitor of humankind.

The tears of the Eye of Ra are part of a more general connection between the Eye and moisture. In addition to representing the morning star, the Eye can also be equated with the star Sothis Sirius.

Therefore, the Eye of Ra precedes and represents the floodwaters that restore fertility to all of Egypt.

The uraeus is a logical symbol for this dangerous power. In art, the sun disk image often incorporates one or two uraei coiled around it.

The solar uraeus represents the Eye as a dangerous force that encircles the sun god and guards against his enemies, spitting flames like venom. They include both humans who spread disorder and cosmic powers like Apep , the embodiment of chaos, whom Ra and the gods who accompany him in his barque are said to combat every night.

Some unclear passages in the Coffin Texts suggest that Apep was thought capable of injuring or stealing the Eye of Ra from its master during the combat.

Evidence in early funerary texts suggests that at dawn, Ra was believed to swallow the multitude of other gods, who in this instance are equated with the stars, which vanish at sunrise and reappear at sunset.

The solar Eye is said to assist in this effort, slaughtering the gods for Ra to eat. The red light of dawn therefore signifies the blood produced by this slaughter.

He sends the Eye—Hathor, in her aggressive manifestation as the lioness goddess Sekhmet —to massacre them. Retrieved October 4, The Legacy of Ancient Egypt.

Facts on File, Inc. The history of the evil eye and its influence on ophthalmology, medicine and social customs. Documenta Ophthalmologica, 94 1 , The entheomycological origin of Egyptian crowns and the esoteric underpinnings of Egyptian religion.

Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 2 , An Introduction to the Language and Culture of Hieroglyphs. Interdisciplinary Cooperative-Learning Activities , p.

A Complete Introductory Guide. Astronomy and Mathematics in the ancient Near East. See also Katz, V. Princeton University Press, and Robson, E. The Oxford Handbook of the History of Mathematics.

Dedi Djadjaemankh Rededjet Ubaoner. Book Ancient Egypt portal. Retrieved from " https: Views Read View source View history.

Lists with This Book. She passed away in at the age of We just had her headstone unveiling. This was probably not the best book for me to read at this time - but then again maybe it was In the last years of her life, I would go with her to the German Consulate to prove she was still alive, so she could continue receiving her reparation checks.

She would get dressed in her best outfit and walk in proudly to announce she was still alive. There used to be a long line of survivors waiting to go in, the last time I went with her, we were the only ones in the waiting room.

I used to dread going there with her. It was a production. Days before she would get her hair washed and set, the day of she would get up early and do her makeup and fuss over her outfit.

I would always say "why do you dress up to go there? Then she would announce to everyone in the room that I was her granddaughter.

Now I will never go again. Last year we had our first Thanksgiving, Hanukkah and Christmas without her I have a half Jewish - half Christian family.

There are not many survivors left in the world which is why I am glad that books like this exist. I always love books based on true stories.

In many ways, I think they are the best kind. I also love the pictures of Lale and Gita Sokolov. Lale told his story over the course of three years to the Author.

Lale became the Tatowierer "Tattooist" of Auschwitz and Birkenau. Being the tattooist gives him special perks - more rations, better sleeping conditions, ability to move around the camp more freely.

He also was able to exchange the money and prized possessions of those who died in the gas chambers for food and medicine. He was generous and provided for many.

He saved lives and I wonder how many survived due to him acquiring medicine and extra food for them. While giving a tattoo, he meets Gita and feels an instant attraction to her.

This book is not only a book about survival during the bleakest of times, it is about triumph of the human spirit, about being pushed to the breaking point but never breaking, about love, about compassion for others, about hope, about losing your faith and about never losing your faith.

It also shows brutality, hatred, and evil but what I hope people take away is the compassion, strength, dignity and resilience that Lale and so many others named in this book showed.

During the darkest times, there will always be those who shine and Lale Sokolov was one of those. Like many survivors, Lale and Gita moved around until they found their place in Australia, began a family and lead a happy and successful life.

Lale proved to have "nine lives" and I was happy to see that he was able to prosper and be reconnected with Gita after the war. With any book dealing with the Holocaust, you know it is going to be sad and scenes are going pull at your heartstrings.

This one will as well. I think most will really enjoy this book and hopefully learn a few things. My family member never talked about it.

I wonder did Lale give Ma her tattoo? Again, there are pictures of Lale and Gita there. It was nice to put faces with the names. When reading books such as this, I think most readers will wonder, could they have survived.

I believe most of us will never know what we are capable of until we are placed to the test. God willing, none of us are ever placed to this test.

See more of my reviews at www. View all comments. There are hundreds, if not thousands, of Holocaust fiction books in the English language alone.

This is not the one to read. This kind of book is hard to rate. Who wants to give the story of a Holocaust survivor just two stars?

Scenes change in the matter of a sentence, the dialogue often seems only broken with stage directions. It was all very one-note. The characters, even Lale himself, are flat and poorly developed.

The whole book felt very amateurish, and I cannot recommend it. I received an advance copy of this book courtesy of the publisher and NetGalley.

Rainforest Escape I agree with you. And I think books such as this should Jan 30, Considering "The Tattooist of Auschwitz" is a harrowing true story, it was truly compelling and utterly unputdownable.

On arrival at Auschwitz in he immediately stands out to his fellow prisoners who save his life when he tak Considering "The Tattooist of Auschwitz" is a harrowing true story, it was truly compelling and utterly unputdownable.

On arrival at Auschwitz in he immediately stands out to his fellow prisoners who save his life when he takes ill. One of them is a girl called Gita who captures his heart immediately.

Given a reason to survive Lale uses his position for the greater good even through struggles and extreme suffering, with the hope of one day being with Gita forever, outside of the camp.

I immediately took to all the real life characters, they were excellently portrayed whether good or bad and could imagine the whole true scenario with such clarity.

Compassionately written with sensitivity, its emotive, thought provoking, awe inspiring and certainly puts your own everyday problems into perspective.

View all 68 comments. Right after I started reading this book there was a story on the local news about a new exhibit at the Jewish Community Center in our area.

The exhibit highlights the Holocaust survivors from this area. At kiosks you can click on a name, read a bio but what struck me the most was that you can also see a video of the survivor telling their story.

The utmost importance of these stories is reflected at the beginning of this book by author Graeme Simsion: Heather Morris has retold the story of Lale Sokolov, a Jewish prisoner at Auschwitz who becomes the camp tattooist and while there finds the love of his life, Gita.

This stared out as a screenplay she wrote as Lale told her his story and has been developed into this "novel".

Lale from the first day he arrives in Auschwitz by cattle car, makes a vow to himself that he would survive this and after falling in love with Gita, he makes a promise to her that they will have a life together when they are out.

That he can speak multiple languages saves Lale multiple times as well as connections made with other people imprisoned, with workers from the outside and even a German guard.

With jewelry and cash gotten from the women who work in the building where belongings are sorted, Lale with his savvy, his courage and with some luck barters for time with Gita for the price of chocolate, a piece of sausage , a hunk of bread, a diamond or ruby.

But he also provides as much food as he can to others. He helps many people along the way putting himself in danger each day as each day he tattoos numbers onto the arms of the new inhabitants.

He does seem to have an existence in some ways better than most in the camp and better than when he first arrived until he is caught with the jewels.

There is not much more I can say other than what Lale himself tells Morris - that he wanted his story recorded so "It would never happen again.

View all 95 comments. This is a historical fiction novel based on a true story. Lale Sokolov tells his story based on true events.

He became the main tattooist of Aushwitz and falls in love at first sight with Gita who he first met tattooing her arm. He tattoos all the new prisoners with their identification numbers.

Lale is a Jew. He is on the first transport of men from Slovakia to Auschwitz in The concentration camp was very horrifying. Lale did have some special privileges, since he was the tatto 4.

Lale did have some special privileges, since he was the tattoist. He had lots of freedom than the other prisoners. He was so brave and had lots of courage.

He would exchange jewels and money from murdered Jews for food to keep others alive. If he was caught he would of been killed. Many prisoners owed him their survival.

He was a leader among the other prisoners. Their are some graphic scenes that are a little dark. This book stands out from other Holocaust related novels.

It is an emotional read. The Nazi guards are monsters, they kill and hurt human beings. Lale was determined to survive. This is a terrible story but it also is a story of hope and courage.

I really did love this story. It was almost like reading a memoir, but a little different than a memoir. This story is an emotional read, but I also found it uplifting at times.

I would say this is a safer read than other Holocaust novels. I am so happy that the author spent a lot of time with him, to tell his story.

She really did an amazing job on his character. All the characters were very well done and made this novel come alive. I loved the love story between Lale and Gita and how they fall in love at first sight.

I love a romance in a novel only when there is lots of suspense. Its always the suspense that I am looking for and this one has ok plenty of it.

I felt so sad for Cilka, and everything she went through. I also felt sad for Leon. There are some scenes that are graphic but this is the Holocaust, a horrifying time and as I mentioned before this is a safer read than other Holocaust books.

I could not put this book down. It was a page turner. I loved the writing style. This was a Traveling Sister read and I loved reading this with them and it was a wonderful discussion.

This is a great book to do as a group read. I want to thank Netgalley, the publisher and Heather Morris for a copy of this book in exchange for a honest review.

View all 67 comments. I recall, as a child, accompanying one or the other of my parents to our family jeweler countless times.

It seemed as if some piece always needed to be repaired or purchased for one occasion or another. For my tenth birthday I received a small sapphire and diamond ring which was too large and needed to be resized.

One day after school off we went to see Marty and Irv. It was an unseasonably warm fall day and Irv had his shirtsleeves rolled up.

When he placed his arm on the glass countertop, I sa I recall, as a child, accompanying one or the other of my parents to our family jeweler countless times.

When he placed his arm on the glass countertop, I saw the tattooed numbers on his arm for the very first time. I felt, also for the first time, a cold clenching my stomach.

That very day, at the age of ten, I had watched Night and Fog as part of my fifth grade curriculum and my physical reaction was the painful shock of recognition.

It was disturbing to me that this kind and gentle man had been subjected to and survived the death camps.

What I will say about this book is that it tells a story of hope amid horror. I will also say that the writing is sophomoric. However, I do think this is a book that is well suited for young teens as an introduction to this very dark part of history.

View all 40 comments. View all 9 comments. The German government needed workers for their labor camps.

In , all families in Slovakia were ordered to provide a child eighteen or older for work detail or risk having the entire family sent to concentration camp.

Lale Sokolov hoped that by going to Prague to await these instructions his family would be safe. He did not expect to be forced into a cattle wagon and be transported to Auschwitz.

He was determined to do as he was told, reveal little about himself and always be observant. In order to survive, he had to defile innocent people.

The job of "Tetovierer" did have some perks. Lale was given his own room and increased food rations which he hid under his sleeve to distribute to others when possible.

One day, Lale saw a girl with the darkest brown eyes. He made a vow to himself. He will leave Auschwitz a free man. He has just met the love of his life!

Through cunning, luck and love, Lale is instrumental in setting up a barter system with paid bricklayers, Victor and Yuri. Diamonds and chocolate entice an occasional guard or capo as well.

This slim tome documents less familiar aspects of Holocaust literature. This is an incredible book with a story that demands to be heard.

The year is and it gladdens me that books like this are still being written. Because we need to know and understand what humanity is capable of, we need to know what extreme hate looks like so we can work towards building a world free from it.

This is one of our darkest hours, and we need to remember it.

3 Replies to “Book of ra tattoo”
  1. Ich tue Abbitte, dass sich eingemischt hat... Ich finde mich dieser Frage zurecht. Ist fertig, zu helfen.

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